The Eagles Overreact: Yes, Jalen Hurts Is Now MVP

The Eagles are 2-0 and things are about to have fun really fast if they continue to play the way they played Monday night at South Philly.

The Birds already had a very loaded wagon, but this widespread fun over Minnesota on national television is going to turn more heads. Both sides of the ball made plays. The quarterback looked as sharp as ever.

It’s the perfect time to unleash some 120-minute response spice from the game bar.

Let’s overreact:

1. Jalen Hurts is an MVP . candidate

Josh Allen. Patrick Mahomes. Galen Hurts.

During the two weeks of the 2022 NFL regular season, these are the top nominees as the best player.

Hurts’ stunning Monday night football performance, the best game of his professional career, should propel him into the very early MVP conversation.

Is it only september? surely! Hundreds of things will change between now and the end of the year. who cares! In two games, Hurts made a slew of explosive plays, led the attack to a 62-point total, and overall looked like a better version of himself than last year.

Jalen Hurts may have arrived Monday night, and he did so in style.

He did this with both bigger plays and smaller plays. There have been notable contributions to the highlight reel, such as his bombshell to Ques Watkins and his bucket landing to score the birds two highs in the second quarter:

There were also smaller plays, like this excellent third-quarter downward turnover in the first quarter with a definite completion for AJ Brown in a narrow window:

He did it all on Monday night. He ran hard, hit easy short throws in the flats, worked mid-court(!), took shots and looked completely confident and comfortable in his sophomore year on attacking Nick Siriani.

And in case you thought the MVP talk was probably too early, it seems I’m not alone:

After last week’s win, I still wanted to see more. Pain brought more.

333 passing yards. 57 yards dash. Three total landings. He was really cool with that win.

If he can be 90% of this over an entire season, he’s more than The Guy. It could really be elite.

2. The defense is fine

There was quite a bit of tension after the Lions hung 35 points on the Eagles in the first week. Eagles fans for the second season in a row.

Then it happened Monday night, and everything seems to be fine after all.

There are still things I’d like to clean up from Gannon – more intentional pressure would be nice, and soft coverage made a quick comeback early in the third quarter which was disappointing – but he actually managed to make timely blitzkriegs on several occasions against The Vikings, including a brilliant call on the game’s first Minnesota drive to bring in TJ Edwards in a quick center attack that forced Kirk Cousins ​​into a quick throw. He caused pressure after a big turn in the fourth quarter put the Vikings in the red, resulting in Cousins’ third smart of the evening.

I felt a competent and thoughtful performance from the defensive coordinator. It was nice.

Just as important, the talent for defense was beginning to surface.

Haason Reddick is still tough on covering passes – another place Gannon needs to clean up – but felt the off-season addition generated a lot more pressure than it had in the first week. Darius Slay remains one of the NFL’s top volleyball players, while Avonte Maddox once again appears to be one of the best opener corners in the league. Keizer White blinks several times in the first few weeks.

There have been a lot more new pieces coming this season than the Gannon and Eagles have been working defense wisely, so it’s understandable if the first outing of the year wasn’t terribly clean. (The Lions also scored 36 points in Week Two, so maybe…are they any good at scoring?)

Overall, I liked what I saw in round two a lot more than what I saw from week one, and I think Ben Gannon is planning things a little better and the best defenders of the Eagles showing their potential, things should be fine this year.

3. Nick Siriani needs to keep his foot on the gas

I hate, hate, hate Nick Siriani shooting a field goal instead of going 4 and 6 on the 22-yard line of the Vikings. Not only did the blocked field goal temporarily breathe new life into Minnesota — play the score, play the decision — but the fact that the Eagles had made 51 plays and achieved 416 yards of attack at that point. That’s a ridiculous 8.15 yards per game. The crime has been a buzz all night, and you’re trying to put away a good team that quickly loses your faith. Step on the gas. Go down first, score a touchdown, and finish the thing there.

There was absolutely no reason for Siriani to doubt his offense could gain six yards. It’s not as if the decision came at the end of a three-way race set up with a surprise spin: The Eagles walked 59 yards in 10 games across over six and a half minutes.

I’ve loved everything Sirianni has done so far this year. He was aggressive in the first week and likely saved the Eagles from getting caught behind by the feisty Lions. He’s obviously fine-tuned the attack to perfectly fit Jalen Hurts’ skill set, and Hurts takes advantage of that effort.

But he needs to stick to his guns when it comes to keeping teams away. The Lions snuck back into the thing in Week 1. If the Vikings score a prohibited field goal, things may run sideways in a hurry. Don’t give them that chance. Keep pushing, because you have the weapons to do so.

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