Aaron Judge and Albert Pujols get close to the major records she’s managing: NPR

Albert Pujols, shown here in 2010, has been a super hitter for 22 seasons bringing him close to 700 career paths (left). Aaron Judge (right) shy away from breaking the MLS record at home this season.

John Grishop/MLB via Getty Images; Elsa / Getty Images


Hide caption

Caption switch

John Grishop/MLB via Getty Images; Elsa / Getty Images

Albert Pujols, shown here in 2010, has been a super hitter for 22 seasons bringing him close to 700 career paths (left). Aaron Judge (right) shy away from breaking the MLS record at home this season.

John Grishop/MLB via Getty Images; Elsa / Getty Images

With baseball’s regular season coming to a close in just over two weeks, all eyes are on two players — one in his prime and one who was great for so long into his final season — both approaching major home racing stages.

The MLS record for one season at home has been consistent since 1961, continuing even through the steroid-fueled home-run craze of the late 1990s and early 2000s. In two decades, no player has come close to breaking it as New York Yankees All-Star player Aaron Judge did this year.

And Albert Pujols of the St. Louis Cardinals, nearing the end of his last season in 22 years of Major League play, is still shy of 700 home runs, a number so high that only three MLB players have made it.

The regular season ends in early October, leaving players with more than a dozen matches to accomplish feats.

Aaron Judge scored the MLS at home

Having scored 58 and 59 in Sunday’s game against Milwaukee, Judge is now just two shy of the home AL record, which fellow Yankee Roger Maris scored 61 times in 1961.

As of Tuesday, Judge has 16 more regular season games to hit two (to tie) or three (to overtake) more homeowners. Ever a mediocre team player, Judge doesn’t talk much about the mark. On Sunday, he objected that chasing records was “never [his] concentration.”

“Numbers, they are just numbers,” Judge said. “I am focused on doing what I can to be a good teammate, to help the team win. If that means hitting Homer, that means hitting Homer.”

Important note: While Judge is within reach of an AL record, the all-time season record set by Barry Bonds in 2001 is much higher, at 73 homers. But that record, along with the next five spots on the list (all set by Sammy Sosa or Mark McGwire), was set during baseball doping era. Several players during that time, including Bonds, Sosa, and McGwire, were either suspected or accepted to use performance-enhancing drugs.

The judge could also become the eleventh player in AL/NL history to win the “Triple Crown” – in other words, to lead his league on three separate stats: hit average, home run and run (which was first recorded as the official stat). 1920). Judge is already ahead in homers and RBIs, and his hitting average is currently 0.316 behind the leader.

Albert Pujols and 700 home games

That’s not a “record” in and of itself—but still, the home-run 700 Club is perhaps the most exclusive fraternity in baseball. Only three players in MLB history have made over 700 teammates, and their names are familiar to even the most die-hard viewer of baseball: Barry Bonds, Hank Aaron and Babe Ruth.

This was a long time in the making. The Pujols has been playing in the major leagues since 2001, and has been a great hitter throughout his career.

Ahead of returning to the Cardinals for the season, baseball’s oldest player Pujols announced that this year — his twenty-second season — would be his last.

Entering the season with 679 pro players, the odds of him reaching 700 seemed close. And now, he’s getting closer to the ring: Since the middle of last month, Pujols have racked up 12 players, including 698th in a game against the Cincinnati Reds on Friday.

Even the opposing coaches express their admiration for Pujols. “It’s hard not to be affected by this, even when you’re on the wrong side of it,” Reds manager David Bale said after Friday’s game.

As of Tuesday, the Cardinal has 14 regular season games left. Pujols need two more people to number 700.

Additional reporting by WUWM’s Chuck Kirmbach.